Exploring the covered passages of Paris

Covered-passages-of-Paris

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Bonne Année! Happy New Year! Well 2016 was a doozy but here we are one week down in 2017 so let’s get right into it.

One thing of Paris that I think doesn’t get enough attention are covered passages of Paris. Now found only on the Right Bank, these Belle Epoque era walkways offer a glimpse of the past and provide some very unique shopping experiences.

covered-passages-of-paris

Glass ceiling

The covered passages, many with glass ceilings, were originally created as a way for Parisians to avoid bad weather (still true today) and the smell and grime of the streets (also somewhat true today). Just as in the past, the covered passages also provide a short cut between streets and some really fun window shopping. Only about 15 of the original 60 passages are left and each passage has its own character and are really fun to explore especially on rainy days.

When my friend and I set out to explore them, I printed out the super easy map from Smarter Paris. Smarter Paris does have an app but because the phone I was using was really old and didn’t have a SIM card (my new phone had had an unfortunate encounter with a bowl of water and was drying out), I printed out the map and followed it effortlessly. Passage des Princes was the only one we couldn’t find but I think that was due to the construction covering up some street names.

It takes about 3-4 hours depending on how often you stop to look and shop so definitely plan for half a day.

In the next several posts, I will be sharing photos of the covered passages we explored.

Bises (kisses),
Kimberly

Don’t be scammed! How to know which Parisian churches are free

Paris-travel-tip

When strolling the streets of Paris, it is hard not to miss the stunning old churches that dot the city. They are magnificent works of art in their own right and often have gorgeous frescoes painted by famous artists.

Unfortunately, Paris is known for the abundance of scam artists so it is important to know which churches have free entry like at Notre Dame and which churches have paid entry like at Sainte Chapelle. Once when I was visiting the Abbey of Saint Germain des Pres, a free entry church, a very official looking man tried to get me to pay to enter.

So that you aren’t scammed, here is how you tell the difference…if the church is “active” meaning the church still holds services and provides ministry to the people, it is a free church. Notre Dame is still an active church holding Mass and other services so entry to the church itself is free. There is a fee to visit the bell tower. Sainte Chapelle, however, is no longer an active church which is why there is a fee to enter.

You will find that most of churches in Paris are free entry and are a great budget friendly way to view the history, art and charm of the city.

Bises (kisses),
Kimberly

Pro tip: Not glamorous but sure functional. When touring around Paris, I always wear a money belt with a little extra cash and a credit card in case I get pick pocketed.  Buy yours here (affiliate link).*

*Disclaimer: The Paris Itinerary is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

If you decide to purchase anything through the affiliate links on this post, I will receive a small percentage of money from the company at no extra cost to you. Thank you in advance for supporting The Paris Itinerary.

Easy navigation tip to know Right Bank from Left Bank in Paris

RIght-and-Left-Bank-of-Paris

You have probably heard people reference the Right Bank and Left Bank sides of Paris when talking about locations of certain arrondissements (districts), areas like the Marais or St. Germain des Pres, shops and cafes but how can you tell which side is the Right Bank and which side is the Left Bank?

Paris is divided by the Seine River with the Right Bank, also known as Rive Droite, being the north side and the Left Bank, Rive Gauche, being the south side.

But no worries if directions aren’t your thing or you get turned around while touring the city, a major tourist site can help you navigate. Continue reading

The Paris Itinerary 2015 blog post wrap up

2015 year in review

It is hard to believe we are almost two weeks away from closing the books on 2015.

As always, I am so grateful for your support! The Paris Itinerary is nothing without its readers.

In case you joined the party late or life got a little in the way, here are a few posts you may have missed.

From January: Packing is ALWAYS a hot topic when going to Paris. Here is what I DON’T pack.

From February: It was radio silence in February as I prepared for year deux of The Paris Itinerary. If you really want to read the only February post…here it is

From March: Four people to contact to let them know you are traveling to Paris.

From April: A video review of my FAVORITE travel bag

From May: Probably the most important thing you need to know if you plan to visit The Louvre – where to buy your tickets. Trust me, you want to know this tip!

From June: Where to get the best FREE city/metro of Paris.

From July: Oh my! Where to stay in Paris? I have a  hotel review AND an apartment rental review!

From August: August was all about the French tradition of taking a long “les vacances.” Here is my favorite “Paris Pause.”

From September: If checking out the largest Paris flea market, Marche aux Puces St. Ouen, is on your to-do list, then you’ll want to read how to get there including how to avoid “the gauntlet” of aggressive street peddlers.

From October: Travel gear! Need I say more?

From November: “Fluctuant Nec Meritur” which means “tossed by the waves but not sunk.” Je suis Paris. I am Paris.

From December: Planning a trip to Paris in 2016? Tips for saving up for your trip. It is easier than you think.

As we get ready to kick off 2016, let me know if there are topics you’d like me to cover!

Bises (kisses),

Kimberly

Travel blogger’s tip for walking all over Paris in comfort

Paris is a walking and stair climbing city whether you are wandering around Marche aux Puces St. Ouen (Paris’s largest flea market) or on a hunt for treasure at the Louvre and you don’t want sore feet and fatigued legs to ruin your visit.

I’m sharing my travel blogger tip on what I use to minimize this – Dr. Scholl’s Custom Fit Orthotic Inserts, CF 110
† (affiliate link*).

This video was tapped LIVE on Periscope. Join in on the fun at http://periscope.tv/Paris_Itinerary.

 

This post is part of the weekly #MondayEscapes hosted by My Travel Monkey and Packing My Suitcase.

Packing my Suitcase

It is also part of the monthly #AllAboutFrance hosted by Phoebe of Lou Messugo.

Lou Messugo

 

†Before purchasing through the Amazon affiliate link, please follow the directions described in the video. There are different insets based on calculations from the Dr. Scholl’s standing kiosk.

*Disclaimer: The Paris Itinerary is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

What are affiliate links? If you decide to purchase anything through the affiliate links on this post, I will receive a small percentage of money from the company at no extra cost to you. Thank you in advance if you do decide to make a purchase.